Follow-up on fundraising tactics

Here is a letter that went out by email during the university’s latest fundraiser, and notes on the appeals used.  These techniques are applicable to any non-profit donor cultivation/stewardship strategy.

<dynamic photo creates emotion/excitement>

The UNCG community is incredible! We are so proud of our alumni. This has truly been a 48-hour celebration of Spartan love! <WE are wonderful!>

We have now achieved four of the five challenges. Because of you, UNCG has now received: <YOU are wonderful!>

-A $10,000 challenge gift from Jennifer Smith Hooks, ’76 because we gained 100 donors by 7 p.m.
-A $1,500 challenge gift from Nick Rau, ’04 because 100 GOLD alumni made a gift.
-A $3,000 challenge gift because the #BelieveInTheG video was shared 100 times.
-And a $2,000 challenge gift because the #BelieveInTheG hashtag was shared 300 times.<Not possible without you. Direct benefit of contribution. Strokes ego.>

We only need 50 more donors to make a gift before midnight in order for UNCG to receive the grand total challenge pool of $85,000. Please make your gift now and be one of the 50 alumni who will help UNCG in these final hours. <Creates urgency>

When you #BelieveInTheG, thousands of students achieve their dreams. Make your gift of any amount now before midnight. <Implies if you DON’T give you will be crushing dreams>

With Spartan pride,

Sarah Kathryn Coley
Associate Director of Alumni Engagement

<Puts a face to the appeal.  Choose someone your donor base can relate to.  In this case, the campaign was launched through social media to attract younger alumni, so a fresh, young, smiling face was a good choice.  Even though your development team is in charge of the campaign, it’s usually a bad idea for the appeal to come from them.  It can come from someone in Education or Exhibits, or directly from the Executive Director or a board member.  You can even ask one of your members to sign the letter, as a direct appeal from one member to another.>

 

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